If you’ve pounded the cobbles, jostled with hordes of tourists, wilted in queues for the ‘must-sees’ and yet remain in love with Italy, consider Lucca in Tuscany as a slow travel destination or base for your next experience of la dolce vita.

Ignore the current herd mentality: ‘Tuscany is done to death. Florence is overcrowded. Chianti is expensive and overrated’. Head to Lucca for an experience that is quintessentially Italian, in a city that is very liveable for residents and tourists alike.

Yes, the scenery in the surrounding countryside is jaw-dropping – olive groves, vineyards, peach and cherry orchards. And yes, the medieval buildings, churches, and monuments are awe-inspiring. It’s the essence of Lucca and its citizens (Lucchesi), the ease of getting around, and its proximity to other transport hubs that differentiate Lucca as an ideal destination.

Lucca is defined by le Mura, an ancient 12-metre high, 4.2km stone wall that surrounds the historic centre of the city. Originally built to protect citizens from invading Pisans and Florentines, the wall is now a tree-lined promenade and wooded park for the Lucchesi and invading visitors. On any day, the wall resembles a treadmill of strollers, amblers, dog-walkers, runners, and cyclists. On its grassed and wooded bastions, locals engage in cross-fit, yoga, board games and any number of other activities.  It’s a venue to meet friends, sit, read, and for those with time on their hands, to while it away. Drop down from the wall into il centro and you’ll discover a maze of cobbled streets, lanes and piazze. There are myriad shops, bars, delis, restaurants, trattorie, pasticcerie and gelaterie. Of course, there are also supermarkets, banks, pharmacies, and the usual trading establishments you would expect to find in a thriving city. After all, unlike many of Italy’s other, more touristy cities, the Lucchesi live and work in their historic centre.

Lucca is not however confined to its historic centre. Outside the wall and beyond its pastured fringe, a tree-lined ring-road spills traffic to nearby residential, commercial and agricultural areas, and to all the services essential to support the city.

The Lucchesi are a paradox of professional and polite yet warm and friendly, parochial yet cosmopolitan, and laidback yet conscientious. In the hotels and restaurants and in many of the shops, staff speak sufficient English to easily accommodate visitors. They know when you buy a coffee that you’ll likely want to sit at a table outside, and they don’t charge extra for table service, which is common in many of Italy’s busier tourist cities.

Getting about is easy. Walking or better still, cycling is the most convenient way. In fact, the centre of Lucca is limited to residents’ vehicles and in much of the centre, vehicular access is prohibited. Whether you’re an accomplished cyclist keen to take advantage of the fantastic cycle routes on offer outside the city, or a novice hoping to master a few laps of le Mura and pick up dinner from the deli, there are bike shops that can rent or sell you the right bike for the job. Lucca is a city of bike users and bike aficionados.

Options for activities in Lucca are plentiful. Shopping ranges from high-end designer stores to farmers’ markets. Take in some of the sightseeing, festivals, shows, exhibitions, and concerts on offer. There’s something for everyone. Take a language course or a cooking class. Don’t be surprised, when you’re out for dinner, to find there’s a free concert in the piazza you’re dining in. For the more active, there’s hiking, mountain biking, equestrian, and cycling.

Within an hour of Lucca and an easy day trip by train or car (or by bike for the fit), you can visit the vineyards, wineries and olive oil producers in the hills of Lucca and in Monte Carlo; the seaside resorts of Viareggio and Versilia; the spa towns of Bagni di Lucca and Montecatini Terme; the mountain towns of the Garfagnana; or Pisa (and its famous tower). Many are worthy of at least one night’s stay, if you have the time.

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Florence and all that it offers, Siena, the hill towns of San Gimignano and Volterra, and the Italian Riviera cities of La Spezia (the southern gateway to the Cinque Terre) and Portovenere are within easy reach by train or car. You will almost definitely want to consider making more than a day trip to these.

Venture further afield by car or by public transport; trains hub out of Pisa and Florence, and both cities are serviced by international airports.

If you’re looking to immerse yourself in la dolce vita, Lucca is an easy and relaxed destination to do it from. Expect the unexpected, take the time to observe the locals, soak up the atmosphere and experience the culture. Do as little or as much as you like; you just might not want to leave lovely Lucca.

Big thanks to guest blogger – Niki McNeilage from Wellington who is spending a few months living in and experiencing the charms of Italy, Spain and France.

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